Download To Render Invisible: Jim Crow and Public Life in New South by Prof. Robert Cassanello PDF

By Prof. Robert Cassanello

What defines a city's public house? Who designates such parts, who determines their makes use of, and who will get to exploit them? ultra-modern "Occupy" circulate has introduced common cognizance to those matters, yet Robert Cassanello demonstrates that such questions were a part of city lifestyles for greater than a century. Rough-and-tumble nineteenth-century Jacksonville serves as a springboard to his exploration of social transformation in Florida and the South. while unfastened black males within the urban first started to vote, conservative lawmakers driven blacks from white public areas with a purpose to make blacks voiceless--invisible--in the general public sq. and hence making the general public sphere a white area. The reaction used to be a black counter public that from time to time flourished clandestinely and at different occasions challenged racism within the public sphere. Fortified via the theories of Henri Lefebvre, David Harvey, and Jurgen Habermas, this can be the 1st e-book to target the tumultuous emergence of the African American operating type in Jacksonville among Reconstruction and the Twenties. Cassanello brings to gentle a number of the purposes Jacksonville, like Birmingham, Alabama, and different towns during the South, keeps to fight with its contentious racial earlier.

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To Render Invisible: Jim Crow and Public Life in New South Jacksonville

What defines a city's public house? Who designates such parts, who determines their makes use of, and who will get to exploit them? contemporary "Occupy" circulation has introduced frequent awareness to those concerns, yet Robert Cassanello demonstrates that such questions were a part of city existence for greater than a century. Rough-and-tumble nineteenth-century Jacksonville serves as a springboard to his exploration of social transformation in Florida and the South.

Extra resources for To Render Invisible: Jim Crow and Public Life in New South Jacksonville

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In another case in the summer of 1865, Captain Henry M. T. Company I, 34th Division, was punished for drinking with his soldiers in his quarters and was reported to have been seen dancing and wrapped in an embrace while lying in bed with a black woman in full view of black soldiers under his command. 13 For the judges acting on behalf of the Union Army, actions in public and private spaces could transmit social meanings these military officials wanted desperately to avoid. Although the military tried to punish white officers for leaving blacks with the possible impression of social equality, their official efforts left blacks with very mixed signals.

S. Army Re-Ordered Spaces \ 17 General Court-Martial records, throughout most of 1865 black soldiers either did not resist this punishment or were not punished in this way as there were no court-martials denoting this behavior. These September events along with the incidents of public punishments over the course of the previous year set the stage for the mutiny. On October 29th, a black soldier was arrested allegedly for stealing molasses from the camp kitchen. After some resistance, Lieutenant Colonel John L.

Second Lieutenant Henry K. T. Company D, 34th Division, was punished for a series of racially charged comments made publicly and privately to other white soldiers. 14 The punishment of black soldiers by the military authority demonstrated the ways in which actions in public spaces were part of a larger discourse on racial equality and the democracy of space. S. Army was charged with preserving law and order in the city for most of the 1860s. A large number of African Americans remained during and after the War—soldiers and civilians alike.

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